Cheesemaking in the Alps!

Here is a YouTube video that my friend, Lava sent me on cheesemaking in the Alps. Another friend of hers made a video of her daughter making cheese on a bigger scale then I have ever done. The video is really interesting because you see her process (in fast forward) and also see the cows and the surrounding Alps. Really great video. Also lets you know what’s involved in the cheesemaking process.

Every winter I make cheese. I do it in the winter because I’m always too busy with the garden the rest of the seasons. Last year I made a Butterkäse cheese on Dec 28th. It seems every winter I get a hankering to make some cheeses. This December I’m making a cheese called Raffine which I started Dec 21 and is similar to a Camembert but differentnot quite as soft and no bloomy rind. It only takes 28 days till it is ready to eat, which is really quick and good for my short attention span! I hope to make several cheeses in 2021.

My friend Bob asked me If I ever tried making a Parmesan cheese. The answer is NO, because it takes 18-24 months to age before it is ripe enough to eat. That is why it is so expensive because the aging process takes so long. What if I waited all that time and it didn’t turn out? EEEk! What a waste of time.

So I make cheeses that are aged and ripe anywhere from 1 month—6 months. I once made a Gouda. The Dutch in the Netherlands pronounce it Houda (Howda) and it was really good but takes 4-6 months till ready. That’s about as long as I have the patience to wait for a a cheese to be ready. But it’s well worth it when done.

5 comments on “Cheesemaking in the Alps!

  1. Hannah says:

    Hey 🙂 It’s me who makes the cheese in the video! So funny, that it got to you! My cheese also needs to ripe 6-12 months, or, if you want, you can let it ripe 2-3 years. Than it’s nearly like Parmesan! The good thing about hard cheese is, that it’s burned hotter than quick ripe cheese… I burn about 52°C, quiet hot to take the cheese out. Parmesan would be around 56°C, so not far from my Berner Alpkäse 🙂
    Well, greetings to you!
    Hannah

    Liked by 1 person

    • Hannah! So glad to meet you! Thanks for writing! My best friend is Lava (Mechthild) Ewersmeyer who splits living in Germany and the States. She got the video from your mom who is friends with Lava. Lava is one of her clown students. Since I started making cheese again, Lava sent me your video, which I really enjoyed watching your process and your beautiful set up. Where are you located? Do you also milk the cows? And who do you sell to? And lastly, do you live in the Alps all year long? Just curious. Your mom did a great job with the video and I love her music that she has on it. You were great too and I wanted to show Americans how someone in the Alps makes their cheese.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Hannah says:

        Hey, nice to meet you too here 🙂 We’re just in the summer season, June-September living at the Alp. Yes, me and my boyfriend milk the cows on our own. It’s just a small place, so we have about 30-40 cows to milk. The cheese starts to ripe on the Alp and after summer every Farmer who has cows on the Alp take the cheese home. They mostly sell to friends or in a fridge by the road. Or eat the cheese 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • Hannah says:

        We’re just in the summer season, June-September living at the Alp. Yes, me and my boyfriend milk the cows on our own. It’s just a small place, so we have about 30-40 cows to milk. The cheese starts to ripe on the Alp and after summer every Farmer who has cows on the Alp take the cheese home. They mostly sell to friends or in a fridge by the road. Or eat the cheese 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • Thanks for the info. I love that you two do it all, from milking to finishing the cheese to selling them! Do the cows come down off the mountains in the winter?

        Liked by 1 person

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